What are the best questions to ask at the end of an interview?

12/11/2022 - Actualizado: 26/10/2022

An interview can be a nerve-wracking experience. You’ll likely be asked a mixture of standard questions like “Why are you leaving your current role?” and “Tell me about a time when...” There will also probably be some unexpected queries, such as quizzing you on random facts about pandas, geese or something else entirely.
Interview Questions - What were some of the most difficult questions that you were asked during the interview process? Do you remember? If not, perhaps it is because they were the types of questions that you don't usually get in job interviews. Those are what we call interview questions: Extremely Difficult New ones. Read on to learn more...

What are the most difficult interview questions to answer?

To get a better idea of which questions might come up, ask yourself the following: What is the job you’re applying for? What skills and qualities will be most important for the role? Who are your potential colleagues? What is your potential manager like? Once you’ve answered these questions, you should have a better idea of the types of difficult interview questions that you might encounter.

For example, if you’re applying for a role within research and development, you’ll likely be asked about the latest technological advances. If you’re applying to be a salesperson, you’ll likely be quizzed on your sales pitch. If you’re applying to a customer service role, you might be asked about how you handle difficult customers.

Why are the most difficult interview questions so hard to answer?

It’s important to remember that interviewers ask difficult interview questions for a reason. They want to test your ability to think quickly under pressure. They want to see how you respond to different types of questions and stress. They want to get a sense of who you are as a person.

They want to see how you present yourself. They want to see how well you can negotiate. They want to see how quickly you can analyze a situation. They want to see how you respond to stress. They want to see how you respond to criticism. They want to see how well you can negotiate. They want to understand how you behave in different situations. They want to see how you respond to criticism. They want to see how quickly you can analyze a situation. They want to see how well you present yourself. They want to understand how you behave in different situations.

Which skills and qualities will be most important for the job you’re applying for?

This question is related to the one above. Interviewers will likely ask you what skills you have and what qualities you think are important for the job you’re applying for.

The key here is to be specific. Instead of saying something like, “I’m a hard worker,” you should provide an example of how you’ve been hard working in the past. For instance, if you’re applying for a sales position, you might want to say, “I’m a hard worker because I know that it takes a lot of effort to meet a sales quota, and I’ve shown in the past that I’m capable of working hard.”

How long do you expect to stay in this role?

Most interviewers won’t ask this question bluntly, but they may hint at it. They may ask, “What do you like most about your current job?” Or they may ask, “What are your plans after this job ends?” Their goal is to get a sense of how long you plan to stay in their company.

While you don’t want to give an exact number (since you don’t know how the job will affect you), you do want to give an idea of your expectations. If you’re unsure how to respond, you can say something like, “I’m always looking for a position that allows me to grow and expand my skill set. I also like to switch up my environment so that I don’t get bored.”

Can you name a time when you had to work with a team but ended up working independently?

This question is worded to see if you’re able to take charge when necessary. Interviewers want to see if you can delegate tasks to team members and then head off and work independently. They also want to see if you’re strategic enough to know when to work alone and when to collaborate.

For example, if you’re applying for a marketing role, you might say, “I’ve had experience with this in the past when I worked as a marketing intern for a tech company. The team I worked with was creating a new app, and I was tasked with finding new SEO strategies.”

What is your biggest weakness?

This is one of the most popular interview questions, and for good reason. It’s a way for interviewers to see both sides of you—your strengths and your weaknesses. It’s also a way for them to see how you respond to criticism. It’s a way for them to see how well you can negotiate.

While you don’t have to say that your weakness is working too hard, you do want to give a short example of a time when you struggled with something in your professional life. For example, if you’re applying for a writing role, you might say, “I’m always working on new content, and I sometimes get so focused on creating new material that I don’t take time to proofread it. I’ve definitely learned from that mistake, and I’ve become more focused on creating amazing content and less focused on creating as much of it as possible.”

What are the best interview questions to ask at the end of an interview?

While it’s important to ask questions throughout the interview, there’s no doubt that the best questions to ask are at the end. You want to leave the interviewer with a positive final impression, and you want to show that you’re interested in the company and position.

You also want to show that you’re prepared—that you’ve done your research and know a bit about the company and the people working there. You can ask questions like, “What do you like best about working here?” Or, “What are some challenges that you’re currently facing?”

That said, you also want to be careful about the questions you ask. You don’t want to ask anything too controversial or offensive. You also don’t want to ask anything that’s too unrelated.

How to Prepare for an Interview

  • Practice your introduction. This is your first impression, so make sure to practice it so it sounds natural and authentic. Speak slowly, and remember to smile.
  •  Know your interviewers. Find out as much as you can about the people who will be interviewing you. If you can, try to find out what their interests are and what they like to talk about.
  • Outline your responses to interview questions. You don’t want to get caught off guard, and you don’t want to waste time thinking of things to say while the interviewer is waiting.
  •  Remember why you’re there. Interviews can be stressful, but they can also be really fun. Try to relax and enjoy the conversation, and remember that you’re there to show them what you’re capable of.

If you were asking What are the best questions to ask at the end of an interview?, also you can find more answers in the articles from Interviews topic.

Summary of the article

Alvaro Saez

CEO of Chuiso and TeamPlatino. Marketing enthusiastic and spanish entrepreneur based in Madrid who combines his work as a teacher at Teamplatino with his passion for online marketing, artificial intelligence and real estate investments.

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